If you’re silly enough to get run-out like that then it’s your own fault, says David Warner on legalised ‘Mankading’

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David Warner thinks that 'Mankading' is a spirit of cricket thing

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If you’re silly enough to get run-out like that then it’s your own fault, says David Warner on legalised ‘Mankading’

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SportsCafe Desk

03/10/2022

Marylebone Cricket Club recently made some changes to the game and the rules will be implemented from October 1st. One of the important rules from the updates include legalising running out the batter at non-striker’s end for backing too much and David Warner has shared his views regarding the rule.

Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) made changes to the existing rules of the game recently. Two main rules in the updates include legalising running out the batter at non-striker’s end for going out of the crease in the start before bowler completes his action. Another important update includes that if a batter gets caught then the new batsman coming to the crease will directly take the strike and it will not matter if the batters from two ends have crossed each other or not. 

There has been a lot of discussion regarding the legalisation of ‘Mankading’ and several former cricketers have supported the decision. Stuart Broad has opposed the change and he has faced a severe backlash on social media for it. Reflecting on the change, David Warner has opined that if a batter gets run-out in this way, it will be his fault only. 

"I think it happened more predominantly at the end of a white-ball 50-over games, or obviously in T20 cricket we've seen it but at the end of the day, as a batsman, you've got to stay in your crease. There's no doubt about that, and if you're silly enough to get caught out like that and run out, that's your own fault. You're told not to leave before the bowler lets the ball go, so just don't do it," Warner said to reporters. 

The incidents of Mankading have ignited debates around the spirit of cricket in the past. In IPL 2019 R Ashwin dismissed Jose Buttler in a similar manner for backing up too much. In the same season, David Warner kept his bat behind the crease when Ashwin was bowling as he paused while delivering the ball. Both these incidents have sparked a debate around whether this mode of dismissal is in the spirit of the game or not. 

"I still think the history of the game suggests it's a spirit of cricket thing. You don't expect players to do that. I do agree with the fact that if you are backing up, and you're out of your crease by a long way (you are fair game)," he stated.

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